38. Regulator mount, top motor mount, fixing the horn...

A blow by blow photographic account of chopping from stock to chop... This projcet has been given its own forum due to the large number of photos it contains making uploading slow for those of you still on "dial up".
Post Reply
Prof
Founder, Choppers Australia
Posts: 5800
Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Willunga, South Australia
Contact:

38. Regulator mount, top motor mount, fixing the horn...

Post by Prof » Thu Aug 09, 2007 12:38 am

I have gotten quite a few jobs done since last post... Engine is in. Chain is in and adjusted, heads, barrels, rocker covers done, oil hoses all connected, push rods done and adjusted, new plug leads ...

One thing when building a chopper from the bottom up, is all the things that don't go as planned... eg Purchased new carby manifold clamps and they were too small. Have to go off to the supplier again.

I bought new outer pushrod covers as the old ones were rusty. Come assembly time, they were between .3mm and .47mm too small in diameter. I spent an hour linishing the aluminium inners to fit... no time to send these back to sydney and wait for another set.

When I came to assemble the top end of the engine, I discovered the gudgeon bushes had not been done. Another half day lost going back and forth (I don't have the necessary reamers).

When I began putting the cams and timing gears in I found that two were missing. After an hour of searching every possible place in my workshop, it was back to Adelaide with $200 for the replacements. Guess what I found when I opened the piston boxes... correct... the missing gears had been put in one of the upturned pistons. Time and dollars. Time and dollars!!!!

Well here's a couple of jobs that may interest you...

1. Regulator mounting...

I have shown a couple of ways nuts can be fixed so that components can be assembled needing only one spanner. Here's another way. I forgot to weld nuts to the two crosspieces before painting, so have joined the two stainless nuts with a piece of welded 3/16" rod. Light, unobtrusive and it works well.

Image


2. Top engine mount...

A new engine mount is needed for two reasons... the frame has been stretched upward and the old one was pretty ugly...

Image
3/16" Stainless bar has been marked, drilled and one end slotted. Note the nice rounded ends done using a washer as a guide. This tin gives the right size curve...

Image
Curve cut with angle grinder and linished smooth...

Image
Vertical tap, cut and clamped into place ready to be tack welded...

Image
Marking holes. A sharpened spoke makes a good marker... a bit harder steel so holds its point. I use a thick texta so the mark will show up. Cheaper than marking dye.

Image
to hole is too close to top of tab so weld in a bit of scrap...

Image
Linished up . Note holes are oversize.


Image
Carby is going to be suported off engine mount with some stainless rod. Would have preferred 1/4", but have run out so will try 3/16". Here it's been threaded.

Image
A sure way to get sharp bends. A piece of scrap bar with holes drilled to take different rod sizes. Us a piece of tube as bending handle. For a tight bend it needs to be a tight fit. Note flat on the end of the bending bar insert.

Image
The difference between bending with a tight fitting bar and bending with out it. I've pulled out the insert so you can see hove it is done...

Image
Polished engine mount and carby support.

3. "Come blow your horn..."

Michael has insisted on having an air horn, but as air horns have multiple tones they are illegal in some states.... hmmm so we'll hide the air horn under the seat and have a nice kosher horn on display... with a two way switch within easy reach... "Gee officer. I think I did hear an air horn somewhere now that you mentin it. this is what mine sounds like... see it down there!

Only trouble is the darned horn ain't makin no noise!

Image
Most horns are quite simple and it's ok to pull them apart... just a pair of points and a magnet. Horns often go quiet on you because they have dirty or corroded points or are out of adjustment.

Image
Clean the points with some emery and then make sure no residue is left by pulling a piece of paper through them. Check that the two wires aren't broken.

Image
Here's the adjuster... on Hondas (which this is) the chrome cover has to be lifted to get to it. To adjust, hook up your horn wires to a battery or battery charger... (doesn't matter which way) and turn adjuster until you get the loudest sound. Put cover back on and Bob's your uncle.

Image
Here's the legit horn mounted and you can see the two way selection switch under the electrics cover.

Well that's it for tonight. I've still got a pile of pics of the last couple of weeks' work to edit and resize but not tonight baby!.
Chopit'nrideit... Prof

Post Reply

Return to “83 Sportster project...”